Posts Tagged ‘Innovation training’

Strategy – What’s that?

Monday, August 22nd, 2016

Strategy – Innovation – what’s that?
By Roger La Salle

Of course we have a mission
No doubt you have a mission which is most likely about growing your business to be best in class, but do you have a formal documented business strategy? Have you documented underpinning tactics of how you will implement that strategy?

Have you included your team in developing your strategic approach and more importantly, has each member of the team embraced an implementation role with metrics and deliverables they have accepted and agreed? Without that you may be flying blind and simply bounding from one opportunity to the next ever searching for short term revenue and profit growth.

Is it Innovation?
To many people innovation is thought of only in terms of making new and better products and services with the expectation that such new offerings will keep the business buoyant and growing.

Though this is a sound strategy it’s just one of the so called “verticals” that are possible, and the art of innovation, and in particular the new paradigm of “Opportunity Capture” are the means to access the many other verticals to achieve business growth, just some of which include:
• Organic
• Acquisition
• Range extension
• New verticals
• New markets
• Cost down
• Price
• Place
• Variety
• Customer Service
• Quality
• Innovation
• Brand
• Efficiency and speed
• Exports
• Partnering
• Agency
• Franchise
• Off-loading orphan technologies
• Staff inclusion – part MBO
• MBO
• Basic research
• And many more

It’s all very logical
This may all sound like management 101 but how many businesses really do develop a documented strategic approach to business building with underpinning tactics and reports as to progress?

Uncertain times
I think it would be fair to say we are living in uncertain times with businesses all facing margin squeeze, the BREXIT unknowns, the USA deep in election mode and the Chinese market in transition. The time to be revisiting your strategic plan is now, and to do it with your team in an
“off-site” where you are free of disturbances. The alternative may be to wake up one morning and realize the world has changed and we didn’t change with it.
**** ENDS ****

Roger La Salle, trains people in innovation, marketing and the new emerging art of Opportunity Capture. “Matrix Thinking”™ is now used in organizations in more than 29 countries. He is sought after as a speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development and is the author of four books and a Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australia and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panelist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. www.matrixthinking.com

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So it’s good to fail – is it?

Thursday, May 19th, 2016

So it’s good to fail – is it?
By Roger La Salle

Are these people “for real”
Yet again I was at a conference hearing speakers on innovators and entrepreneurship in essence extolling the virtues of failure. The inverted logic suggests that if you fail often enough the learnings from this will somehow as if by magic eventually lead to success. It seems that for some it’s axiomatic that failure begets success.

Does this really happen?
Time and time again the common theme of all speakers that have made it big is that they had to fail first to learn the lessons that led to their success. Further, many, no in fact all, suggest that it was their persistence against all the odds that led to their success. The doubters and naysayers were aplenty, but they persisted and won. I have no argument with these people and one must admire their success. Of course the take aways from such presentations are twofold. First, it’s ok, indeed perhaps even good to fail and second, if you persist you will win.

There is a saying I picked up that was doing the rounds in Malaysia some time ago to the effect that a person has only two options, to persist or die. This saying was indeed embraced and promoted as good business thinking. I trust not too many took it literally.

What’s the real message?
Whilst persistence is important, indeed vital, one must be aware of when to stop. It’s a bit like what Einstein is said to have stated, doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different outcome is madness. Admittedly, the new product entrepreneur may simply be looking at different ways to make or sell something, but notwithstanding, there does come a time to cut ones losses and move on.

As for the art of failure, yes it’s ok to fail, but fail fast and fail cheap, don’t bet the farm on any single initiative as the odds of success are small, almost vanishingly small when you compare the number of successes with the number of triers.

The digital age
In this the digital age we can now see budding entrepreneur nerds popping up everywhere where the cost of exploring new horizons can be negligible. I wonder how much was invested to get Facebook off the ground, or Twitter or Amazon for example, compared with a company such as Apple where the start-up investment would have been huge.

Sure the digital age has opened new doors, but still the same advice applies.

What now
As more speakers come to the podium, and of course we only get to hear from the successes, please refrain from preaching these uninformed opinions. Failure may be a good learning curve, but it’s not a virtue, nor is blind persistence.
**** END ****

Roger La Salle, trains people in innovation, marketing and the new emerging art of Opportunity Capture. “Matrix Thinking”™ is now used in organizations in more than 29 countries. He is sought after as a speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development and is the author of four books and a Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australia and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panelist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. www.matrixthinking.com

**** END ****

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Business Insight – The Innovation Agenda

Monday, April 25th, 2016

The Innovation Agenda
By Roger La Salle

The Innovation Agenda
In Australia the new Prime Minister is strong on innovation, we are to be the innovation economy. This is great news, but why don’t we actually innovate instead of just talking about it – the mind boggles, it’s always more of the same.

A Case in Point
Despite our talk of innovation, what we see in Australia like in most developed countries is that innovation is entirely lacking when it comes to solving one of the biggest problems – traffic.

Even in Australia a country with really only two well populated cities and just 22 million people, over 1.5 million new cars are sold every year, and with the life of a car running at ten plus years all we see are ever growing traffic queues.

Will roads fix that?
Of course the common and simplistic solution proffered by Government is to make car access more difficult by providing more bike lanes, seldom used to anywhere near the downside effect they have on traffic flow, or financial penalties for entering the city precinct with tolls and car parking levies.

Quite simply this is crazy stuff which does little more than frustrate workers and put them at odds with their governments.

The other tried and failed approaches include building more roads and wider freeways, or improved public transport.

Sorry to say, all of these are costly failures.

In the case of more roads, people that tire of traffic snarls turn to overcrowded public transport. Meanwhile the government widens and builds more roads, the result is that traffic flow improves, so people revert to old habits, back to road travel and the consequent log jam of traffic. It’s a never ending cycle.

As for public transport, there is simply insufficient capacity and even if there was, there is no place to park at public transport hubs and of course the traffic to these, assuming there was sufficient parking, would again be gridlocked.

What’s the Innovation?
We are told that high speed internet is the answer to the world’s problems and in the case of traffic, this is indeed the case.

If you walk into any inner city office all you will see are people perched over computers doing their jobs or speaking on telephones. The question must be asked, “why do they have to be centrally located?” Simply, they don’t.

With proper internet access and good multimedia 90% or more of these people could work from home and maybe attend the office once a week or even less to keep in social contact with other staff.

In reality, the only people that need to be in the city are those needing a personal customer interface, like bank tellers, doctors, dentists, shopkeepers and restaurateurs. The rest could be at home being much more productive and saving hours per day in travel time with a lot less energy wasted in frustration waiting in traffic queues.

So what’s lacking?
In essence what’s lacking is a proper management reporting method so people’s performance can be managed from afar with little need for personal interface.

Such reporting is easy to do, all it takes is a proper understanding of how to put metrics around job functions, a method embodied in the innovation of “The Principle of Contradictory Reporting”.

It’s that easy is it?
Yes – the answer is simple, the effect dramatic and the extra revenue to government coffers provided by restraining road works would be enormous.

If you wish to be the Innovation Economy – then for heaven’s sake – think like an Innovator?

**** END ****

Roger La Salle, trains people in innovation, marketing and the new emerging art of Opportunity Capture. “Matrix Thinking”™ is now used in organizations in more than 29 countries. He is sought after as a speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development and is the author of four books and a Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australia and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panelist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. www.matrixthinking.com

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Business Insight – Is it Innovation or Research?

Monday, April 4th, 2016

Is it Innovation or Research?
By Roger La Salle
Setting the scene!
To preface this article the following TED talk may be worth a watch, (although I did give this link in the last article). This talk shows some of our energy problems and is a real laugh as you get into it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kg1lFjRKKHY

A little one sided
The ABC in Australia recently screened a program on the virtues of home battery power storage. Unfortunately they failed to once mention that with present technology there is absolutely no financial payback for such a system. Further, even a 10kWhour battery would have insufficient power to cook a single large family roast dinner.

Of course the charging of batteries can be from solar panels but no mention was made of the cost of these or the need to keep them clean or that in Australia even the most sun drenched place has only 36% of full sun hours. To their credit the program highlighted the great benefit of off peak charging from the grid.

No doubt that in the fullness of time local power will be the order of the day. How long it takes us to get there is anybody’s guess but one thing is certain, whilst this technology is being rolled out, with vast subsidies, power prices are being forced up and tax payers worldwide are footing the bill whether or not you embrace this technology. Much the same of course can be said of the power from the ever growing array of wind farms.

On the positive side one may think this will eventually lead to the extinction of the ugly, expensive and fire prone poles and wires – not so.

More poles and wires are being installed every day to support the growing farms of wind generators, again subsidised by the taxpayer.

Personally, I am all for renewables, but at what cost and who is driving this agenda and what is the effect on power hungry industries such as aluminium manufacture or smelting and the like. Is this agenda killing industries in developed countries, industries that make essential products that are not then removed from the face of the earth but simply relocated to lower cost countries with the nett effect on carbon emissions being the same or more likely, even worse.

Can it work anywhere?
Presently I am involved in a project that uses battery power, supplemented in some small way by the grid, but this is a commercial application with real payback, a positive value proposition. That makes it workable and different and we don’t need any government subsidy to make it workable.

Innovation – the way forward
Anybody that knows me recognises I am a champion of innovation, but in the commercial world innovations need to stand on their own legs.

Innovation is about “change that adds value”, otherwise it’s called research.

**** END ****

Roger La Salle, trains people in innovation, marketing and the new emerging art of Opportunity Capture. “Matrix Thinking”™ is now used in organizations in more than 29 countries. He is sought after as a speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development and is the author of four books and a Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australia and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panelist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. www.matrixthinking.com

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Is Sustainability – sustainable?

Tuesday, March 1st, 2016

Is sustainability – sustainable?
By Roger La Salle

Is the video more powerful than the pen?
This business insight is a recent TED talk. It exposes some very serious issues, but is quite entertaining and funny as well, so I am advised.

The talk actually went for close to an hour but the TED people very skillfully edited it to their preferred 18 minute format.

Please have a look, think about the message, have a laugh and forward it to a friend or colleague.

Next month’s article will ask the question – “Is it good to fail?”

**** END ****

Roger La Salle, trains people in innovation, marketing and the new emerging art of Opportunity Capture. “Matrix Thinking”™ is now used in organizations in more than 29 countries. He is sought after as a speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development and is the author of four books and a Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australia and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panelist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. www.matrixthinking.com

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Metrics For Managers

Sunday, August 4th, 2013

Metrics for Managers
By Roger La Salle

Measuring work performance is vital to ensure we are making good decisions.

Indeed, there is an old saying: “if you can’t measure it, don’t change it”.

This particularly applies to process innovation where the cost benefit of changes can usually be accurately quantified before they are ever made.

Do Innovation Managers deliver?

As for innovation management the same applies.

If you are investing in innovation then it is important to understand the return that investment delivers. That is real returns and not abstractions like “It’s important to be seen as innovative”! Further, the return should ideally be forthcoming within 18 months. If this is not happening then it may be time to entirely review your approach.

Measuring the Cost benefit

It is interesting that in many businesses the cost benefit of most employees can be accurately measured.

In processes of course this is easy, so too in accounting and law and consulting where people are expected to bill typically 70 to 80 percent of their time to a client at a rate of at least double their actually cost. This is easy to measure with time sheets.

Abstract job functions

But what of the managers of:
• Products
• Categories
• Sales
• Marketing
• Communications
• Finance
• HR
• and so on, and what of their subordinate staff and executive assistants?

I am often amused when I see the English version of “The Office” with people silently poised over computer keyboards. One wonders just what value each and every one is delivering and moreover if and how it is measured?

Senior management!

As you career develops you may reach the dizzy heights of senior management or even get lost in the bureaucracy. Apart from some KPI’s that can usually be met by clever operators, there is usually no real measure of the return on investment that you or even your position delivers. What would happen if you or that position was no longer there? Would somebody take up the slack, perhaps the business may well proceed as normal?

In the case of very senior positions, perhaps those people making several millions of dollars per year, this is an interesting question.

One answer may be to explore the value and accuracy of decision making. For example if one person at the top can make just one better decision than a person that may have been passed over for the position, that single better decision may be worth millions, or even billions.

Steve Jobs was a classic example of a great decision maker.

More work to be done on this!

The bottom line is that we need to find proper ROI measures for all positions to be sure each and every staff member is delivering at least twice what they are costing.

More will be said in this is coming months.

Roger La Salle, is the creator of the “Matrix Thinking”™ technique and is widely sought after as an international speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development. He is the author of four books, Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australian and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panellist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. Matrix Thinking is now used in more than 26 countries and licensed to Deloitte, one of the world’s largest consulting firms. www.matrixthinking.com

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Australian are a forgiving lot!

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

Aren’t we Australians a gullible lot? Roger La Salle

Over the course of the 20th century the taxes of the Australian people built the PMG Department that included both telecoms and post.

Some year ago these entities were separated and the PMG became Australia Post and the telecom part, Telecom Australia.

Some years later, the Government, probably in a cash grab, decided to privatise Telecom Australia and create Telstra; and guess what – they had the cheek to sell it to us. To sell us an asset, we the Australian people, already owned!

The government made a bucket load of money from that transaction.

Now after many years of successful trading and bringing innovation to the market, guess what, my taxes are now financing a rival to Tesltra in the form of the NBN.

The government sold me Telstra and now is using my money, my taxes, to build a rival.

Sometime in the future, you can bet the NBN will also be put up for public offering, no doubt after an unsuccessful attempt to decimate Telstra.

Boy are we suckers for government policy.

Finally, to add insult to injury, just how clever are those Telstra people.

Telstra have long realised that their cable network and ducts were fast becoming a liability and that in the not too distant future wireless will be the dominant internet delivery means. So what did Tesltra do – of course they sold all their ducts to those idiots running the Government, and for billions to boot!

Whether I am a labour or liberal voter is irrelevant, what is relevant is that too often our so called leaders make monumentally stupid and in my view unethical decisions.

Roger La Salle, is the creator of the “Matrix Thinking”™ technique and is widely sought after as an international speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development. He is the author of four books, Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australian and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panellist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. Matrix Thinking is now used in more than 26 countries and licensed to one of the world’s largest consulting firms. www.matrixthinking.com

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Exploring the 3rd. Horizon

Monday, June 3rd, 2013

EXPLORING HORIZON THREE! Roger La Salle
In my penultimate business insight the McKinsey’s three horizons was presented demonstrating the unsurprising fact that research has shown that less than 3 percent of executive time is actually spent exploring the third horizon. Yet this is the one most relevant to the longer term survival and growth of an organisation
EXPLORING THE THIRD HORIZON
In many cases business and association conferences engage speakers known as a futurist to present some insights as to what the future may hold. Such people most often deliver interesting and engaging talks, mostly about where technology is taking us and the gizmos of the future, fascinating as they may be. However, the direct relevance of this to your business may be somewhat obscure so perhaps an alternative approach could be considered. This alternative is somewhat more rigorous than the abstraction of futurism and is based on the known mathematical methodology of extrapolation.

In short one of the best ways to explore horizon three and envisage where you business, or perhaps just as importantly your industry sector is heading, is to plot a trajectory curve of the past and extrapolate that to the future. This approach leads to outcomes far more precise than the abstraction of futurism and allows you to make plans to position yourself precisely at the future waypoint.

How can we do this?

The starting point is to first decide what represents your core offering.

McDonald’s is an excellent example. Their core offering is definitely not great tasting and wonderful food, but standardised safe food at an affordable price but most of all with a minimum of queuing time (i.e. convenience).

As competition emerged to challenge McDonald’s they rose to the occasion by expanding their range to match their competitors. Most of all they leveraged their core offering of convenience, by providing customers with drive through service. An extrapolation of this core offering of fast convenient food would have revealed the need to migrate the drive through service well in advance of its initial introduction. Now so firmly has McDonald’s embraced this convenience offering that it is in fact usually much faster to use the drive through service than to enter the shop and get served at the counter.

An extrapolation of the present convenience at McDonalds may now be to offer even faster service, if that’s possible. One wonders how long it may be before an iPhone app will be developed to allow “pre-ordering” and collection via a rapid drive through
“E-queue”, possibly with payment via a direct debit from an iPhone app even before you get to the store.

Convenience stores

Another example of this extrapolation approach may be to look at convenience store businesses. What is the core offering of a convenience store, certainly not low price, but convenience of course! Based on an extrapolation of that we would look to offer even greater convenience, and what would that be? Drive through convenience stores, again maybe with a pre-ordering App and even pre-payment?

Use this to foresee the future!

This type of extrapolation approach can be done in many industries. The only requirement is for your management team to be able to agree on your core offering(s) before applying extrapolation as a means to forecast the longer term position of your industry and to thus make plans to address this new horizon.

This is far more likely to provide accurate outcomes than the abstraction of futurism and can be done with your senior team at you next management getaway. You may be amazed at the outcome, an outcome that reveals horizon three and sets you apart from the competition.

Roger La Salle, is the creator of the “Matrix Thinking”™ technique and is widely sought after as an international speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development. He is the author of four books, Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australian and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panellist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. Matrix Thinking is now used in more than 26 countries and licensed to one of the world’s largest consulting firms. www.matrixthinking.com

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Selling a Winner – not always Easy!

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

Selling a winner- Not always risk fee!
Roger La Salle 2013
Selling a winner
The supposed secret to market success touted by all leaders and marketers is to have a positive value proposition. If you can show a clear customer benefit the rest is easy we are told, but let us examine this conclusion.

A sure winner – life saving products?
At first glance one may believe that simple cheap life saving products and solutions will always be a market winner as the value proposition is clear – invest in “A” for a few dollars and save my own life. Such an investment would appear to be outstanding value for money but even here we need to be careful in jumping to a conclusion.

Unfortunately, like it or not people seem loath to invest in prevention. It seems the “it won’t happen to me” syndrome is alive and well. There are numerous examples that prove this:

The following had to be legislated to save people from themselves:

• You must fasten your seat belt when driving, despite every car being fitted with one, people still fail to do so
• You must carry life a separate jacket in a boat for every person. A life jacket can be purchased for as little as $15.00.
• To protect people from themselves, it has now been legislated that for boats under a certain size a life jacket must be worn at all times.
• Your house must have a smoke detector, this despite smoke detectors costing as little as $7.00
• Your vehicle tyres must have a suitable tread depth
• You must carry chains in snow country
• Motor bike and now all bike riders must wear a helmet
• A helmet must be approved as useful to stop people flouting the law

We see that even in the case of an unarguable potentially lifesaving value proposition the market outcome is not always predictable.

Process Innovation – unarguable value for money!
In process innovation, like the implementation of say an automation system, a clear value proposition can usually be mathematically proven. For example it is quite easy to calculate the benefit in labour saved compared with the cost of implementing the automated system. Normally such an investment is predicated on an investment return of typically 12 to 18 months and from there on it is all “upside” In this case one may have thought a “go” decision would be obvious. However this is not always the case as unforseen circumstances can often occur.

The GFC brought many unstuck!
As the GFC spread like the plague through economies, companies that had invested heavily in automation may have been in for an unfortunate surprise.

Unlike labour intensive businesses that could lay off staff in bad times, companies that had taken on serious debt to finance automation projects were hit hard by the need to continue to finance interest payments on their investments whilst their cash cow of ever growing demand evaporated. The conclusion to be drawn from this is that even in good times, investments showing a strong value proposition need to be questioned and financed with sufficient “slack” to manage any severe market downturn. A failure to abide by this principle can leave the company leader with many sleepless nights if demand shrinks.

Conclusion
Market risk is by far the biggest business risk but even that cannot be removed by a positive value proposition, nor can an investment on a pure mathematical basis, particularly in process improvement as the GFC proved.

The secret is to always invest in new initiatives well within your means, do not take even the most obvious markets for granted so at to ensure survival if the market fails or circumstances beyond your control eventuate. Too many people “fly” on confidence alone and ignore this axiom – much to their peril.
**** END ****
Roger La Salle, is the creator of the “Matrix Thinking”™ technique and is widely sought after as an international speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development. He is the author of four books, Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australian and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panellist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. Matrix Thinking is now used in more than 26 countries and licensed to one of the world’s largest consulting firms. www.matrixthinking.com
Regards,

Roger La Salle
Innovation – Opportunity – Inspiration
Conferences – Key Notes – Workshops – Facilitation

www.matrixthinking.com
Twitter @rogerlasalle
Mobile 0418 370 828
Office + 613 9842 7267
Fax + 613 9842 2260
Sponsor – INNOVIC Next Big Thing Award

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The Business of Business

Tuesday, November 27th, 2012

The Business of Business
© Roger La Salle 2012
Maintaining the theme
The last business insight drew an overwhelming response. Continuing on the theme of the picture being worth a thousand words, below is a link to the first of a series of 13 short sessions done with the Deloitte Innovation Academy.

This may seems like basic stuff, but hang in there and learn the only one way to really build a business.

“The business of business is fundamentally simple”! Have a product, sell enough at the right price and you have a sustaining business, the rest is just how you go about achieving that. This is where this video series is heading.

I hope you find this introduction of interest and please feel free to pass it on or publish in any form you may wish.

Regards
**** END ****
Roger La Salle, is the creator of the “Matrix Thinking”™ technique and is widely sought after as an international speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development. He is the author of four books, Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australian and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panellist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. Matrix Thinking is now used in more than 26 countries and licensed to one of the world’s largest consulting firms. www.matrixthinking.com
Regards,

Roger La Salle
Innovation – Opportunity – Inspiration
Conferences – Key Notes – Workshops – Facilitation

www.matrixthinking.com
Twitter @rogerlasalle
Mobile 0418 370 828
Office + 613 9842 7267
Fax + 613 9842 2260
Sponsor – INNOVIC Next Big Thing Award

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend