Posts Tagged ‘Julia Gillard’

Australian are a forgiving lot!

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

Aren’t we Australians a gullible lot? Roger La Salle

Over the course of the 20th century the taxes of the Australian people built the PMG Department that included both telecoms and post.

Some year ago these entities were separated and the PMG became Australia Post and the telecom part, Telecom Australia.

Some years later, the Government, probably in a cash grab, decided to privatise Telecom Australia and create Telstra; and guess what – they had the cheek to sell it to us. To sell us an asset, we the Australian people, already owned!

The government made a bucket load of money from that transaction.

Now after many years of successful trading and bringing innovation to the market, guess what, my taxes are now financing a rival to Tesltra in the form of the NBN.

The government sold me Telstra and now is using my money, my taxes, to build a rival.

Sometime in the future, you can bet the NBN will also be put up for public offering, no doubt after an unsuccessful attempt to decimate Telstra.

Boy are we suckers for government policy.

Finally, to add insult to injury, just how clever are those Telstra people.

Telstra have long realised that their cable network and ducts were fast becoming a liability and that in the not too distant future wireless will be the dominant internet delivery means. So what did Tesltra do – of course they sold all their ducts to those idiots running the Government, and for billions to boot!

Whether I am a labour or liberal voter is irrelevant, what is relevant is that too often our so called leaders make monumentally stupid and in my view unethical decisions.

Roger La Salle, is the creator of the “Matrix Thinking”™ technique and is widely sought after as an international speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development. He is the author of four books, Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australian and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panellist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. Matrix Thinking is now used in more than 26 countries and licensed to one of the world’s largest consulting firms. www.matrixthinking.com

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Ill informed – Bill Shorten

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

Ignorant Labour “Experts”? Roger La Salle
In a radio one on one with Joe Hockey a couple of weeks ago Bill Shorten criticised Joe Hockey regarding the NBN to the effect saying, “why would you want to use that crusty old wireless technology when we can use the vastly superior fibre in NBN”

Well, let us ask a few questions of Mr Shorten?

Firstly, as a non-technical person, you are a trained lawyer I believe, where do you get your information?

Is it from the same bureaucrats that advise you on border protection, or the mining tax, global warming, remember Tiny Tim Flannery saying ”even the rains that fall will not fill our dams”, or the treasury fanciful budget estimates, etc.

Finally Bill, do you have a wireless network at home, a LAN (if you know what that is)?

Yes, I’ll bet you do. So it’s OK to use that “crusty old wireless technology” for the last 100 meters it is it Bill, but not the last mile?

Further Bill, I wonder if any of your experts have told you that wireless signals in fact travel slightly faster, yes faster, that those down a fibre.

Further, do you know that Samsung have just announced that within a few years, long before the NBN is ever completed, if ever, that they now have a technology that can wirelessly download up to 10gbits per second, That’s a quite fast Mr Shorten.

Last of course, wireless will mean we do not need to be tethered to a glass fibre hanging from the wall, unless of course, we all use that crusty old wireless technology for that last 100 meters.

The NBN is a costly extravagance that will never be completed and will be obsolete within a decade at most.

Roger La Salle, is the creator of the “Matrix Thinking”™ technique and is widely sought after as an international speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development. He is the author of four books, Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australian and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panellist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. Matrix Thinking is now used in more than 26 countries and licensed to one of the world’s largest consulting firms. www.matrixthinking.com

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Innovation Metrics – Made simple

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013

Innovation Metrics – made simple
Roger La Salle
ROI is the name of the game!
Just ask any chief executive, businesses are about profits. Make no mistake about that.

Consequently decisions and new initiatives need to be implemented with a mindset of returning value to shareholders. This is one of the prime responsibilities of company Directors and management alike. All significant investment decisions should be made with the mindset of the return on the investment they will deliver.

The Innovation initiative
Many companies these days employ people to develop and manage innovation within the business. Some do it for the right reason, to increase shareholder value, others perhaps because it may be the “done thing” to be seen to have an in-house innovation capability.

If the innovation initiative is not retuning on its investment within 18 month to two years at the most, then like all investments, its ongoing funding needs to be seriously questioned.

In the case of research the drivers are little different, especially pure research where outcomes may take a great many years to mature, if indeed they do at all. However, understanding the difference between innovation and research and the different risk profiles is not the subject of this article..

The trusted and true business axiom
There is an old axiom in business and management, “if you can’t measure it, don’t change it”. This is so true and any business that makes changes without some metric to test the effect is simply flying blind. The same can be said for innovation.

Keep it Simple
In simple terms the measurement should be based on the simple equation as a figure of merit:

Outcome = Output / Input

Where:
• Outcome should be greater than 1
• Input is most often dollars spent in real terms in funding the innovation initiative and bringing new initiatives into the business as well as the time cost expended in dollar terms
• Output is revenue earned or costs reduced as a result of the innovation initiative.

No doubt many would argue, especially those charged with implementing innovation, that the above is too simplistic. However one must ask, “why are we doing this if it’s not to improve business outcomes”? I suggest this is the question that really matters. Further, many will argue that if we persist with the innovation initiative long enough it will surely one day produce that gold nugget.

On the contrary, the longer the innovation initiative goes without producing a valued tangible outcome the less likely it is, as people lose confidence and the initiative loses vigour and enthusiasm.

Some Real Metrics
Below is a list of measures that can be gathered as fact, not opinion:

• Number of ideas submitted for evaluation
• The ratio of the number of ideas submitted to ones actually implemented
• Rate or Trajectory of idea submission (you can be sure this will decline over time unless the innovation initiative is producing results and rewards)
• Number of different people submitting new ideas over time (again the diversity of submitters will decline if there are no perceived positive outcomes)
• Cost trajectory of the innovation department or initiative within the business (you can expect this to increase over the first two years as the initiative gathers momentum. However, this must be curtailed if it is not delivering measurable outcomes).

What Now?
The statistics cited in a research paper some years ago are striking and highlight the necessity for innovation. Indeed the paper noted that whereas the life expectancy of a company in the 1920’s was 65 years, today it is less than 10 and those that fail to innovate fail to survive.

Innovation is an imperative, do it once and do it right and don’t be blindsided by some idealistic vision of innovation as some mystical pursuit for the specially gifted. This is business and business is about delivering real outcomes and real profits. This must be the overriding consideration.
**** END ****
Roger La Salle, is the creator of the “Matrix Thinking”™ technique and is widely sought after as an international speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development. He is the author of four books, Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australian and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panellist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. Matrix Thinking is now used in more than 26 countries and licensed to one of the world’s largest consulting firms. www.matrixthinking.com
Regards,

Roger La Salle
Innovation – Opportunity – Inspiration
Conferences – Key Notes – Workshops – Facilitation

www.matrixthinking.com
Twitter @rogerlasalle
Mobile 0418 370 828
Office + 613 9842 7267
Fax + 613 9842 2260
Sponsor – INNOVIC Next Big Thing Award

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Selling a Winner – not always Easy!

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

Selling a winner- Not always risk fee!
Roger La Salle 2013
Selling a winner
The supposed secret to market success touted by all leaders and marketers is to have a positive value proposition. If you can show a clear customer benefit the rest is easy we are told, but let us examine this conclusion.

A sure winner – life saving products?
At first glance one may believe that simple cheap life saving products and solutions will always be a market winner as the value proposition is clear – invest in “A” for a few dollars and save my own life. Such an investment would appear to be outstanding value for money but even here we need to be careful in jumping to a conclusion.

Unfortunately, like it or not people seem loath to invest in prevention. It seems the “it won’t happen to me” syndrome is alive and well. There are numerous examples that prove this:

The following had to be legislated to save people from themselves:

• You must fasten your seat belt when driving, despite every car being fitted with one, people still fail to do so
• You must carry life a separate jacket in a boat for every person. A life jacket can be purchased for as little as $15.00.
• To protect people from themselves, it has now been legislated that for boats under a certain size a life jacket must be worn at all times.
• Your house must have a smoke detector, this despite smoke detectors costing as little as $7.00
• Your vehicle tyres must have a suitable tread depth
• You must carry chains in snow country
• Motor bike and now all bike riders must wear a helmet
• A helmet must be approved as useful to stop people flouting the law

We see that even in the case of an unarguable potentially lifesaving value proposition the market outcome is not always predictable.

Process Innovation – unarguable value for money!
In process innovation, like the implementation of say an automation system, a clear value proposition can usually be mathematically proven. For example it is quite easy to calculate the benefit in labour saved compared with the cost of implementing the automated system. Normally such an investment is predicated on an investment return of typically 12 to 18 months and from there on it is all “upside” In this case one may have thought a “go” decision would be obvious. However this is not always the case as unforseen circumstances can often occur.

The GFC brought many unstuck!
As the GFC spread like the plague through economies, companies that had invested heavily in automation may have been in for an unfortunate surprise.

Unlike labour intensive businesses that could lay off staff in bad times, companies that had taken on serious debt to finance automation projects were hit hard by the need to continue to finance interest payments on their investments whilst their cash cow of ever growing demand evaporated. The conclusion to be drawn from this is that even in good times, investments showing a strong value proposition need to be questioned and financed with sufficient “slack” to manage any severe market downturn. A failure to abide by this principle can leave the company leader with many sleepless nights if demand shrinks.

Conclusion
Market risk is by far the biggest business risk but even that cannot be removed by a positive value proposition, nor can an investment on a pure mathematical basis, particularly in process improvement as the GFC proved.

The secret is to always invest in new initiatives well within your means, do not take even the most obvious markets for granted so at to ensure survival if the market fails or circumstances beyond your control eventuate. Too many people “fly” on confidence alone and ignore this axiom – much to their peril.
**** END ****
Roger La Salle, is the creator of the “Matrix Thinking”™ technique and is widely sought after as an international speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development. He is the author of four books, Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australian and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panellist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. Matrix Thinking is now used in more than 26 countries and licensed to one of the world’s largest consulting firms. www.matrixthinking.com
Regards,

Roger La Salle
Innovation – Opportunity – Inspiration
Conferences – Key Notes – Workshops – Facilitation

www.matrixthinking.com
Twitter @rogerlasalle
Mobile 0418 370 828
Office + 613 9842 7267
Fax + 613 9842 2260
Sponsor – INNOVIC Next Big Thing Award

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The Business of Business

Tuesday, November 27th, 2012

The Business of Business
© Roger La Salle 2012
Maintaining the theme
The last business insight drew an overwhelming response. Continuing on the theme of the picture being worth a thousand words, below is a link to the first of a series of 13 short sessions done with the Deloitte Innovation Academy.

This may seems like basic stuff, but hang in there and learn the only one way to really build a business.

“The business of business is fundamentally simple”! Have a product, sell enough at the right price and you have a sustaining business, the rest is just how you go about achieving that. This is where this video series is heading.

I hope you find this introduction of interest and please feel free to pass it on or publish in any form you may wish.

Regards
**** END ****
Roger La Salle, is the creator of the “Matrix Thinking”™ technique and is widely sought after as an international speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development. He is the author of four books, Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australian and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panellist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. Matrix Thinking is now used in more than 26 countries and licensed to one of the world’s largest consulting firms. www.matrixthinking.com
Regards,

Roger La Salle
Innovation – Opportunity – Inspiration
Conferences – Key Notes – Workshops – Facilitation

www.matrixthinking.com
Twitter @rogerlasalle
Mobile 0418 370 828
Office + 613 9842 7267
Fax + 613 9842 2260
Sponsor – INNOVIC Next Big Thing Award

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The Picture is mightier than the word!

Wednesday, October 31st, 2012

“The picture may be mightier than the word? © Roger La Salle

Let history be the judge!

We all know that multimedia is taking over the world at the expense of the print media.

It is with this in mind that several recipients of my “Business Insights” have suggested a short YouTube clip may be a good and dare I say, “innovative way” of giving an update on the innovation process and Matrix Thinking.

Below is a link to a YouTube video from a TEDX presentation I did several months ago. This gives quite a good overview of some of my material.

Over 450 people attended this event and nearly as many were turned away.

This talk received the most “Likes” on YouTube of all presentations on the day. I will be doing another TEX event in the New Year.

I hope you find this form of “Business Insight” of value?

Roger La Salle, is the creator of the “Matrix Thinking”™ technique and is widely sought after as an international speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development. He is the author of four books, Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australian and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panellist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. Matrix Thinking is now used in more than 26 countries and licensed to Deloitte, one of the world’s largest consulting firms. www.matrixthinking.com

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The “Third Eye”

Thursday, September 27th, 2012

“The Third “Eye” © Roger La Salle

Too Close to see the business

Often those of us involved in business are simply too close to daily issues to see the potential for real value adding innovations and opportunities or indeed to appreciate some of the things our businesses and people do really well.

Even in the case of business plans, which seldom play-out as forecast, the so called independent “third eye” to review the plan before it is finalised is always a good idea.

The transfer “catalyst” of the “Opportunity Matrix” thinking platform asks us to see if we can transfer this so called “third eye” used on business plans to other aspects of our business.

Following this idea we may implement a formal “third eye” across the business on a periodic basis.

“The Third “Eye” innovation initiative.

Network with a group of your peers and allow them a tour of your facility to review in their own minds what you are doing and how you go about your business.

This does not have to be limited to just the physical or operational aspects of your business but can include your telephone answering technique, your staff presentation and manner, your business card presentation, your signage and even the overall presentation of your facility.

For example, would you prefer to attend a dentist or a restaurant whose premises were beautifully maintained with lovely gardens as you enter, or instead one where the gardens were a mangled mess with absolutely no interest in presentation at all being shown by the business operator?

Obviously, the clean and beautiful presented premise inspires confidence.

With your network now briefed conduct a tour of your business and ask each person to take a note pad with them and write down three things that they individually observe that you do really well.

Also ask them to write down three things that they believe are lacking or need attention and can be done better.

Thus we now have 3 plus 3 innovation initiatives we can explore in an endeavour to innovate or improve our business.

The cost is nothing

A “Third Eye” tour need only take a few minutes and will provide invaluable third party or “independent third eye” insights. More importantly it will assist in identifying your strengths and weaknesses.

This simple third eye can be a real innovation eye opener and can be done at no cost at all.

Roger La Salle, is the creator of the “Matrix Thinking”™ technique and is widely sought after as an international speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development. He is the author of four books, Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australian and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panellist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. Matrix Thinking is now used in more than 26 countries and licensed to Deloitte, one of the world’s largest consulting firms. www.matrixthinking.com

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What’s this years plan?

Thursday, July 19th, 2012

What’s this year’s plan?
© Roger La Salle

Who’s winning in this economy?

With the new financial year upon us, we are now looking back at the years end results and seeing how we tracked in business compared with past years.

Despite assurances from the Federal Government that all is well with the economy, in fact all but the mining States are doing it tough, very tough indeed.

In this economy, again if we remove the mining States, the businesses that are prospering are the lawyers overwhelmed with litigation, receivers and administrators trying to make sense out of failing businesses, accountants trying to make 2 minus 3 equal plus 1 and the child care sector as more mums move into the workforce in an attempt to make ends meet.

The age care sector is also doing well as more people move to retirement or nursing homes, but then again, many people are deferring the retirement decision courtesy of the world economy, economic uncertainty and general fear of the future.

In fact if your business is down in real dollars terms compared with the past realise you are not alone.

Many business operators are 40% and more down and they see no immediate “light at the end of the tunnel”.

Some that may have had done well in the past are now wondering whether to close up shop and call it a day, especially if they have a secure nest egg put away after years of hard work. Why now throw good money after bad in such an uncertain environment? The answer for many is simply, don’t.

Three vital questions need to be addressed

1. How are you tracking compared with last year?

2. Are you going to weather the storm or simply “shut up shop”?

3. If you are in for the long haul what are you going to do differently in the coming year?

The Business cycle

If we look at any business that is at some stage extremely profitable, unless there is protection of sorts or huge barriers to entry others will enter the market in competition. You can be sure over time as more competitors enter a lucrative market that profits will soon be eroded to make the business just an “also ran”.

Petrol stations, convenience stores and coffee shops may fall into this category.

Indeed as profitability falls with market saturation, one thing is sure, when the tough times come, only the fittest survive. Further, when the good times inevitably return, the landscape is far more hospitable as the weak have disappeared and are no longer competitors. In this regard there is definitely “light at the end of the tunnel”.

Going the Distance

If you have made the decision to stay the course and be around for the good times, then questions one and three above need to be addressed?

Question 1 Compare your results and assess the weak areas and decide how to address them, if indeed you believe they are worth saving

Question 3 Ask yourself, “What are you going to do differently this year in order to get a better result?”

We all know the old saying, if you keep doing what you have always done you will keep getting the same result. Perhaps it may be time to embrace a new approach and look at the opportunities afforded by systematically innovating your offering and searching for the next opportunity for your business.

Some Examples

Take Microsoft for example. Ten year ago who would ever have thought Microsoft would be in the hardware business with mobile phones and gaming machines. Who would have thought Nokia, formerly in the lumber business would have become the number one cell phone maker until quite recently and can you imagine an Apple phone – never.

These companies have embraced innovation on a grand scale and so far been extremely successful.

How about You?

The “big boys” if you like, had the financial capacity and brand presence to take some risk, but what of your business? The small local foundry, the machine jobbing shop, the powder coating service or even the suburban Milk Bar, what of these micro businesses, what can be done for these?

The simple answer is Innovation.

Find out what people are doing that is working and do it better. Not everybody in your industry is “going to the wall”, some will be great survivors. What is it they have that you don’t, what are they doing differently or better?

You can you embrace Innovation by changing products to add improvements, “Channel Enhancement” by leveraging your existing customer relationships, “Complementary Products” by fulfilling the entire customer needs or by adding Accessories to platform products you have already sold.

There are huge opportunities available if you are systematic and strategic in your search.

Further, do you have a systematic opportunity search mechanism? An opportunity is simply and “An Observed fortunate set of Circumstances”. Do you know how to position yourself to find this set of circumstances?

Is it all doom and Gloom?

Most definitely not, embrace innovation and opportunity capture and remember only the fit survive the bad times, after that, good time always follow. If you are a survivor the way ahead will soon be clear for you to prosper like never before.

**** END ****

Roger La Salle, is the creator of the “Matrix Thinking”™ technique and is widely sought after as an international speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development. He is the author of four books, Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australian and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panellist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. Roger also chairs two Syndicates of the National organisation, “The CEO Institute”. Matrix Thinking is now used in more than 26 countries and licensed to Deloitte, one of the world’s largest consulting firms. www.matrixthinking.com

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Reduce you advertising spend and Build the Business!

Tuesday, March 27th, 2012

Reduce you advertising spend and Build the Business!
© Roger La Salle 2011

Innovation and Marketing!

Constantly revitalising paid advertisements is one way of maintaining audience attention, but perhaps there are other ways, that may be far more cost effective, if we apply some innovation to our strategic marketing approach.

These days the classic four “P’s” of marketing are a “bit old hat” since the latter “Promotion” once seen in effect as advertising, can now be conducted in many different cost fee ways, courtesy of the internet, the ubiquitous cell phone and of course the social media.

Perhaps these days the 4 P’s should be 3 P’s and an “A” for “Awareness”

• Product
• Price
• Place
• Awareness

Building your market

Few would argue with the proposition that advertising is a somewhat hit and miss business. No doubt the reader would be aware of the old adage that 50% of your advertising spend is wasted. The problem is which 50%?

Without doubt the best way to win customers is by referral or creating a Word of Mouth (WoM) message. This approach will lead to huge customer churn to your business, indeed approaching 100%, far more than the 8% often attributed to advertising.

Developing a WoM Message

As will most things, the fundamentals are simple once you break them down to the basics.

When you service a customer request there are only three possible take away messages that can be delivered:

• Bad News – “I won’t do that again, better tell my friends”

• Indifference – neither a memorable or forgettable experience. No WoM message is created

• Good News – “I loved it and must tell my friends.”

Win your customers – don’t punish them

What is quite amazing is the multimillion dollars businesses spend on television and print media advertising. More amazing is that these companies do not devote a single cent to providing a gift or forgiving a customer error. Sometimes even an error on the part of the business itself. Banks are a great example of companies that run multi-million dollar advertising campaigns to inform people of how wonderful they are yet banks are almost universally hated because they usually punish you with a penalty payment if you make the slightest mistake. I wonder what might happen if banks actually rewarded their customers from time to time?

But let’s not single out banks, many large organisations have become too remote from their customers and perhaps too wedded to the concept of mass advertising to consider the low cost alternative, WoM and winning customers by referral, as a formal business growth strategy.

A Systematic Approach

One of the Matrix Thinking Seeds is called Comparison, and two of the thinking catalysts are “Tracking” and “Transfer”.

Comparison means to compare yourself with others in a similar business, ideally the best; the ones people talk about. The catalysts then ask you to “track” the people using that business to learn why it is talked about. Once you have learned that, can you “transfer” it to your business?

Some examples that have generated great WoM:

1. A local supermarket has attracted a huge WoM following.
In a case when a customer has purchased a large basket of good and an item does not scan properly, rather than holding you up whilst they do a price check, they simply ask you to take it as their gift. The approach has developed a huge positive WoM message and the word is spreading. This is a unique talked about and rare customer experience, and the cost to the supermarket is trivial, especially when compared with their advertising spend.

2. A local caravan park that also have lovely two bedroom units always welcomes
their guests with fresh flowers within minutes of their arrival. On departure they always provide a small gift and thank you for staying. The cost of this is insignificant, the message it sends is overwhelming.

3. The local electrician when called always goes the extra mile when he does a job, maybe puts in a new power outlet, then says, whilst I’m here, maybe I should check your smoke detectors, as a courtesy. This costs nothing, but what a message it sends. You can be sure he will be recommended.

Divert just a small percentage of your advertising spend to a strategic WoM campaign and watch the result, the business will grow as advertising spend plummets. Further, if you are a business with a restricted budget for advertising, then there is little alternative.

Where to Now?

Workshop your business with your staff and perhaps your customers, track your customers, learn what delights them and devote some promotional spend to fulfilling that delight and watch the word spread and the business grow.

Develop and implement a systematic WoM strategy. The results may surprise you.

**** END ****

Roger La Salle, is the creator of the “Matrix Thinking”™ technique and is widely sought after as an international speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development. He is the author of four books, Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australian and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panellist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. Roger also chairs two Syndicates of the National organisation, “The CEO Institute”. Matrix Thinking is now used in more than 26 countries and licensed to Deloitte, one of the world’s largest consulting firms. www.matrixthinking.com

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