Posts Tagged ‘Innovation training’

Innovation Man – Not!

Thursday, February 1st, 2018

Innovation Man – Not?
By Roger La Salle
www.innovationtraining.com.au

A New Year is upon us. Perhaps this may be the ideal time to take a breath and look at your strategy for growth!

Check this out
If innovation is one of your strategic pillars then remember that it’s outcomes that matter, not inputs. Indeed there is an old but must see IBM video that speaks a lot to innovation endeavors. The link is at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XjKh11jpqfc

Note, the intent is brilliant but unfortunately the outcomes are still a work in progress – will it ever be done?

The fact is, innovation does not happen even with deeply inspired people sitting in a darkened room singing the “What if I”….” hymn. “What if I … what……”? We may well ask?

Have a process
There is nowhere to go with such an open ended question. The secret to having outcomes is to finish the sentence with a full body of stimulus words each of which demands a specific answer. In fact properly done there are over 100 stimulus words that can finish the “What if I…” sentence. If you use these you can guarantee innovations will flow, literally as a river of opportunity.

So too in exploring your customer. The key to success in innovation is to understand what your customer wants. One approach is to simply ask. But this is not without its issues, including the one we so often encounter where in many cases customers seldom really know what they really want.

The secret to satisfying your customers’ needs lies in observation, what we refer to as “opportunity capture” with more than 40 ways to observe your customer. But it should not stop there, you also may need to be exploring your customer’s customer to get to the real source of true opportunity.

Finding new opportunities with which to explore and grow your business is the easy part. The real skill comes in evaluating these opportunities underpinned by the simple “technology diffusion model” – a numerical score card for new initiatives to be used as a precursor to your commercialization strategy.

None of this is difficult but your endeavors must be backed by sound judgement and proper risk management. This needs to be coupled with the clear understanding of the single biggest reason for failed innovations, the customer or perhaps better said, Market Risk.

What’s the message?
Now’s the time to review your business strategy and don’t be fooled into thinking that innovation is reserved for the gifted. We are all users of products and services. Engineers, scientist, accountants, lawyers, children, indeed everybody and anybody may be your customer. Use the right tools and outcomes are guaranteed.

****ENDS****

Roger La Salle, trains people in innovation, marketing and the new emerging art of Opportunity Capture. “Matrix Thinking”™ is now used in organizations in more than 29 countries. He is sought after as a speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and Business Development, is the author of four books, and a Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies, both in Australia and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panelist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast

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AICD Article “7 long term megatrends…”

Saturday, December 30th, 2017

Are these really the important long term mega trends?
December 2017
By Roger La Salle
www.innovationtraining.com.au

Regarding the LinkedIn article from the AICD magazine on the “7 long-terms megatrends… “, I find this article largely statements of the most obvious and in some ways a little deceptive.
In the first case, why the comment “climate data shows “NEARLY ALL” warmest years were in 21st Century. Is this deception by omission and pushing a climate change agenda?
As for water, the amount of water on the planet is probably fixed (except for the little locked in concrete mix and the like) and to be sure Australia has been inundated with water for the last six or more years. Any shortage is due to population growth and the prevention of new mass storage dams, courtesy of the Green lobby. The result of course was DeSal plants, now idle but in any case there is no power available to run them, even if they are needed.
The concerning mega trends are many that are not listed including:
1. The growing car population with close to 1.5 million per year being added to Australia’s roads and all Government can do is build more roads, inspiring more cars and more congestion. Time and productivity lost in travel is a huge and a costly megatrend with no end in sight.
2. Spiralling government debt with no solution in sight and a recession, which we have not had for some 27 years (despite the usual occurrence every nine years) bound to occur as we reach our debt ceiling, interest rates rise and the economy tanks. This is inevitable.
3. The shift to the services sector that creates little wealth and is largely funded by government infrastructure spending (more debt) and housing to support our unmanageable immigration inspired population growth.
4. Power shortages driving the manufacturing sector to the wall with no clear policy direction and more debt used to subsidies otherwise unprofitable green inspired power initiatives.
5. Social media that is changing the very fabric of society sometimes for the better other times as for the worse as our children lose the ability to communicate, except by text and news become twitter inspired opinion rather than fact.
6. Unsustainable growth in wind turbines that have too short a life span and are too unreliable to be a viable. Additionally, they kill any coastal creature that can fly with blade tip speed as much as 400 kph. (Where are the greens?)
7. Politicians making short term decisions in the interest of holding government rather that the country, such as a hand full of obsolescent submarines at $50 plus billion to win a couple of marginal SA seats.
There are many other megatrends not even considered in the AICD article.

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Intangible but clearly visible!

Saturday, May 20th, 2017

It’s “Intangible” yet clearly visible!
By Roger La Salle
www.innovationtraining.com.au

A half time talk by a team coach can provide a burst of inspiration, an adrenalin rush and the motivation to get you out there to make an amazing contribution. It’s quite remarkable, the abstraction of inspiration can be clearly visible in physical outcomes with players lifting their game – at least in the very short term.

So too with motivational business speakers. Always great to listen to, they give a lift, you leave their session walking just a little taller ready for action. The question is – just how long does this last? In general it’s very short-term.

Great businesses have a great culture and much like with motivation, the abstract term of culture is clearly visible. You can see culture simply by walking around a business, observing the people, the facilities, the desks and the way people speak, move and interact. Culture is evident everywhere, you just need to observe.

In my business of innovation and opportunity capture, the same may be applied, except there is a difference. If you want the art of innovation to “stick” you need to get to the very essence of the business, the business DNA as we call it. This is where a culture change is made, where the tools of change are rolled out; not to be just experienced, but to be embedded into the business and used.

Unlike the home gym that you may buy in a fit of inspiration and soon discard as long term hard work and not really much fun, with innovation you achieve results immediately, not in months but on the very first day. Further, once people experience this, realize they can do it and moreover it’s actually fun, the risks of it being discarded are gone and a new culture begins to permeate the organisation.

Is this rocket science?
Like a golf swing, when done properly the beauty of innovation is in its simplicity. Innovation is a culture, keep it simple, inspired by capability, method, tools, practice and outcomes.

Do this and see an outcome that is clearly visible.

**** ENDS ****

Roger La Salle, trains people in innovation, marketing and the new emerging art of Opportunity Capture. “Matrix Thinking”™ is now used in organizations in more than 29 countries. He is sought after as a speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development and is the author of four books and a Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australia and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panelist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. www.innovationtraining.com.au

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Innovating the Innovators!

Sunday, April 30th, 2017

“Innovating” the Innovators
By Roger La Salle
www.innovationtraining.com.au

Innovation is certainly flavor of the month, if not the decade, but a question worth exploring is whether or not the conventional approach to innovation can itself be innovated?

Traditional tools ask you to find different ways to think about things. For example, use of the open question such as “what if” about a product or service? Whilst this may be an interesting way to stretch the imagination, it really fails to address the real issue which is the “why” of the “what if”?

Another common approach asks people what annoys or frustrates them and how resolving this may lead to breakthrough thinking.

Whilst these methods have great merit they don’t address the real question of how people interface with products and services. This surely has to be a good starting point and that comes down to observation. This is the real secret.

For example, the realization that a force called gravity existed was not an innovation but a discovery. It was the use people made of this observation, the opportunity if you like, that lead to innovations.

So too the principles of buoyancy, thrust, sound, heat, magnetism, light and the like, you name it!
All of these were discoveries, not innovations or inventions, but they opened the door to innovations in ships, submarines, aircraft, acoustics, navigation, flight and many more. The list of innovations resulting from discoveries, or perhaps of observations, is endless.

The secret that conventional approaches to innovation overlook is that of discovery, or as we refer to it “Opportunity Capture”, for without an opportunity there is little scope for innovation.

A better approach is to first explore the “opportunity horizon” and to look for areas of human interface with the products and services we use and with that in mind use one of the techniques we have developed known as “tracking”. This tool is fundamental to the art of “Opportunity Capture”. Indeed there are 36 trigger questions in the “Opportunity Matrix”.

In business, nothing happens until you sell something.

With innovation, nothing happens without first an opportunity.

**** ends ****

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Innovating the innovators!

Friday, April 21st, 2017

“Innovating” the Innovators
By Roger La Salle
www.innovationtraining.com.au

Innovation is certainly flavor of the month, if not the decade, but a question worth exploring is whether or not the conventional approach to innovation can itself be innovated?

Traditional tools ask you to find different ways to think about things. For example, use of the open question such as “what if” about a product or service? Whilst this may be an interesting way to stretch the imagination, it really fails to address the real issue which is the “why” of the “what if”?

Another common approach asks people what annoys or frustrates them and how resolving this may lead to breakthrough thinking.

Whilst these methods have great merit they don’t address the real question of how people interface with products and services. This surely has to be a good starting point and that comes down to observation. This is the real secret.

For example, the realization that a force called gravity existed was not an innovation but a discovery. It was the use people made of this observation, the opportunity if you like, that lead to innovations.

So too the principles of buoyancy, thrust, sound, heat, magnetism, light and the like, you name it!
All of these were discoveries, not innovations or inventions, but they opened the door to innovations in ships, submarines, aircraft, acoustics, navigation, flight and many more. The list of innovations resulting from discoveries, or perhaps of observations, is endless.

The secret that conventional approaches to innovation overlook is that of discovery, or as we refer to it “Opportunity Capture”, for without an opportunity there is little scope for innovation.

A better approach is to first explore the “opportunity horizon” and to look for areas of human interface with the products and services we use and with that in mind use one of the techniques we have developed known as “tracking”. This tool is fundamental to the art of “Opportunity Capture”. Indeed there are 36 trigger questions in the “Opportunity Matrix”.

In business, nothing happens until you sell something.

With innovation, nothing happens without first an opportunity.

**** ends ****

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Consequential change – what’s that?

Friday, March 17th, 2017

What are the consequences?
By Roger La Salle www.innovationtraining.com.au
Each Matrix Thinking diagrams carries a bold banner called “Consequential Change”. This asks you to think about the consequences of your innovation.

The boldest ever
The A380 Airbus would probably rank as one of the boldest ever innovations. To even contemplate this was breathtaking. The consequence of introducing the A380 was the need for runways and taxiways at all major hubs worldwide to be upgraded and all terminal building to have a second loading deck. The risk of this being a disaster were vast as the redevelopment costs at all major airports was immense.

Fortunately, the A380 is an outstanding success.

Apple and the I-Phone
When Apple introduced the smartphone they virtually killed their market for I-Pods. However, they clearly had thought about this and so innovated the standard I-Pod by introducing the Nano.

How about Wine labels
Recently an Australian company introduced a thermo-chromatic label for red wines, the idea being that the label colour would indicate the ideal drinking temperature.

I wonder if the prudent wine drinker when selecting a nice bottle may too often pass over this one as not “just the right temperature” wine and choose another, not so labeled?

How about locks?
We worked with an innovator with the “perfect” lock that the user could re-key themselves in seconds for less than one dollar. When presented with this, understandably lock companies were less than enthusiastic. Such a lock bypassed locksmiths, one of their major routes to market. The last thing we should do is threaten our channel.

It’s happening anyway!
The consequences for retailers of on-line shopping have been catastrophic as they operate without the vast overheads of staff, premises and stock. However, in this case the force is unstoppable and we are now see major retailers developing their own e-based channels.

UBER and Airbnb are other examples. Banks may be next, now being firmly in the sights of innovators.

What’s the message?
Innovation needs to be developed with the market consequences in mind, the upside being if you can threaten a major player with your innovation, there is a good chance you will be bought out in very short order for great financial gain.
**** ENDS ****

Roger La Salle, trains people in innovation, marketing and the new emerging art of Opportunity Capture. “Matrix Thinking”™ is now used in organizations in more than 29 countries. He is sought after as a speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development and is the author of four books and a Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australia and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panelist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. www.innovationtraining.com.au

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Distance – Curious- to say the least

Monday, February 6th, 2017

Curious to say the least!
By Roger La Salle www.innovationtraining.com.au
A surprise to me…
A recent article from a senior CEO for whom I have some respect caught my attention.

The nub of the article suggested that one of the main problems for Australians with inspired new innovations was the distance to the world’s largest market, the USA.
Is it really true that it’s further travelling from Australia to the USA than the other way round?

Does this strike anybody else as a curious statement?

Why would they bother when we won’t?
Whilst it may be true that the USA is far off, I find it interesting that US based companies will spend millions establishing a place in the tiny Australian market (about the population of the great area of just Los Angeles), but we are daunted by the concept of travelling EXACTLY the same distance to explore the USA market, some 13 times the size of Australia.

One commentator on the Australian car industry even went so far as to say that our problem is that we drive on the other side of the road, compared with the USA and most of the EU. Yet, not surprisingly the “other side of the road manufacturers” spend vast fortunes making cars to suit our tiny right hand drive markets and specific local Design Rules.

So what’s the Issue?
It’s not distance that’s the issue but understanding what true innovation is all about, commercialization and having a proper market entry strategy.

Indeed in a host of workshops we have conducted in recent months covering more than five countries and some 400 SME’s, the common theme was that less than 10% of SME’s have a team developed and agreed business strategy, much less an innovation plan.

Too often we see inspired entrepreneurs confidently travelling to the USA with their basket of innovation expecting to be welcomed with open arms and having the locals embrace them with great vigor. Nothing could be further from the truth, and with Donald Trump now in the White House this is even more the case.

The issue is in the thinking of management, not the distance. The pity is the solution is not all that difficult if one thinks it through carefully.

More about that next article.

**** ENDS ****

Roger La Salle, trains people in innovation, marketing and the new emerging art of Opportunity Capture. “Matrix Thinking”™ is now used in organizations in more than 29 countries. He is sought after as a speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development and is the author of four books and a Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australia and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panelist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. www.innovationtraining.com.au

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Business Insight – Too close to see!

Monday, November 28th, 2016

Too Close to See?
By Roger La Salle
www.innovationtraining.com.au
But it’s obvious!
I have a saying, “The obvious once made obvious is always obvious”.

When you point out the obvious to people the common response is, “I knew that”, as well they may have, but in fact they didn’t until it was pointed out.

For example, if I tell somebody that an odd number multiplied by an odd number always yields an odd number outcome, the common response is “of course, I knew that”. Yes they do now, but until told they hadn’t realized it.

Personally I don’t have a problem with that, it’s human nature, but what frustrates me is when people hear the obvious but are unwilling to change and learn, for fear of – well, I don’t know what?

A case in point
You may find this hard to believe, but this is a true story of how we can miss the mark if we are too close to the problem.

Some months ago I was at a function and speaking with a person who sells a common brand of petrol power tools such as chain saws, blowers, mowers and the like. I suggested they should also be into battery tools only to be promptly told that they have a complete range of battery tools.

I was amazed, I didn’t know that and it’s a common brand.

Check it out?
Curious at being so ignorant I went to their web site and looked, only to find nothing of the sort.

I then went to the little search bar at the top of their home page and typed in Battery Tools. The result shocked me – “No tools match this search term”. How could this be, I had been left in no doubt that they had a complete range.

My curiosity aroused I phoned the company and indeed spoke with the very person who told me they had such a range, only to be told that I needed to search “Cordless” not battery in the inquiry bar as “Cordless” is the industry term.

Cordless I thought, so is my petrol blower and chain saw?

Who is your customer?
Whilst cordless may well be the industry term this company’s web site is targeted at consumers and the public in general
who no doubt would refer to such tools as battery tools. Indeed, to cover all contingencies, what harm is there in cross-referencing both terms in their search bar facility?

Being too close – sad but true.
Just a few days ago, many months after this experience I again checked the company web site and again searched battery tools and again the result, “No tools match this search term”.

I find it immensely frustrating to see people so slow to change and to even consider the obvious?
Knowing your business and being close is of course essential, but so too is knowing your customer, who your web site is targeting and how your customer thinks.
**** ENDS ****

Roger La Salle, trains people in innovation, marketing and the new emerging art of Opportunity Capture. “Matrix Thinking”™ is now used in organizations in more than 29 countries. He is sought after as a speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development and is the author of four books and a Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australia and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panelist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. www.innovationtraining.com.au

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Culture – Like the sweet smell of Chocolate

Thursday, September 15th, 2016

Culture – Like the sweet scent of Chocolate
By Roger La Salle

It comes from the top!
Culture – best defined as “The rules both written and unwritten that guide people’s behavior” must come from the top. Like the sweet scent of chocolate wafting from a fountain, if your culture is not permeating the organization from the CEO down there is little chance of innovation pervading your organizations?

The champions
Like Apple, Google, BOSE, Hilton hotels and McDonalds, all of these successful organizations have a culture set from the top down and nobody can survive in these great companies unless they are on-board and aligned with the culture.

Apple, always ahead of the curve with “cool” products. Google, ever moving into new spaces with unlimited funds to play the game. BOSE with a new level of sound quality from micro speakers and a stylish design, Hilton with impeccable standards the world over and McDonalds with their consistent quality, fast turn-around food that’s safe to eat in even the most hostile of environments.

These great organizations live and breathe their culture. So too it must be with Innovation.

What’s you Culture?
There is no doubt a single inspirational session or workshop will deliver outcomes, that’s our guarantee, however embedding the culture within your organization is really the aim. What is needed is a consistent message from the top and a determination to have all your people on board to always be looking for the next opportunity. Further, done properly, it’s not difficult and always produces lasting results.

The Why
In the fast changing world of today with ever reducing time to market, ever new technologies emerging and disruption happening in all businesses the only organizations to survive and prosper will be those embracing the fine art of innovation.

It’s fun and it works
In short, people love to work in dynamic fast moving organizations, it’s fun, exciting and it gives people the joy of coming to work each day to explore new horizons.

The message is simple, have the CEO on board, excite your people, give them some freedom, some tools and watch what happens.

Roger La Salle
Innovation – Opportunity – Inspiration
Conferences – Key Notes – Workshops – Facilitation
e-mail: rlasalle@matrixthinking.com
Web: www.matrixthinking.com
Twitter: @rogerlasalle
Mobile 0418 370 828
Office + 613 9842 2260

Roger La Salle, trains people in innovation, marketing and the new emerging art of Opportunity Capture. “Matrix Thinking”™ is now used in organizations in more than 29 countries. He is sought after as a speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development and is the author of four books and a Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australia and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panelist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. www.matrixthinking.com

**** ENDS ****

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Strategy – What’s that?

Monday, August 22nd, 2016

Strategy – Innovation – what’s that?
By Roger La Salle

Of course we have a mission
No doubt you have a mission which is most likely about growing your business to be best in class, but do you have a formal documented business strategy? Have you documented underpinning tactics of how you will implement that strategy?

Have you included your team in developing your strategic approach and more importantly, has each member of the team embraced an implementation role with metrics and deliverables they have accepted and agreed? Without that you may be flying blind and simply bounding from one opportunity to the next ever searching for short term revenue and profit growth.

Is it Innovation?
To many people innovation is thought of only in terms of making new and better products and services with the expectation that such new offerings will keep the business buoyant and growing.

Though this is a sound strategy it’s just one of the so called “verticals” that are possible, and the art of innovation, and in particular the new paradigm of “Opportunity Capture” are the means to access the many other verticals to achieve business growth, just some of which include:
• Organic
• Acquisition
• Range extension
• New verticals
• New markets
• Cost down
• Price
• Place
• Variety
• Customer Service
• Quality
• Innovation
• Brand
• Efficiency and speed
• Exports
• Partnering
• Agency
• Franchise
• Off-loading orphan technologies
• Staff inclusion – part MBO
• MBO
• Basic research
• And many more

It’s all very logical
This may all sound like management 101 but how many businesses really do develop a documented strategic approach to business building with underpinning tactics and reports as to progress?

Uncertain times
I think it would be fair to say we are living in uncertain times with businesses all facing margin squeeze, the BREXIT unknowns, the USA deep in election mode and the Chinese market in transition. The time to be revisiting your strategic plan is now, and to do it with your team in an
“off-site” where you are free of disturbances. The alternative may be to wake up one morning and realize the world has changed and we didn’t change with it.
**** ENDS ****

Roger La Salle, trains people in innovation, marketing and the new emerging art of Opportunity Capture. “Matrix Thinking”™ is now used in organizations in more than 29 countries. He is sought after as a speaker on Innovation, Opportunity and business development and is the author of four books and a Director and former CEO of the Innovation Centre of Victoria (INNOVIC) as well as a number of companies both in Australia and overseas. He has been responsible for a number of successful technology start-ups and in 2004 was a regular panelist on the ABC New Inventors TV program. In 2005 he was appointed to the “Chair of Innovation” at “The Queens University” in Belfast. www.matrixthinking.com

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